Written by Chief Trust Officer, Kyle Pickner

Our focus for financial literacy month is to help customers navigate the complexed world of finance. Whether you’re a retiring Boomer, the forgotten Gen X, or the prime earning millennial, we have some personal finance tips for individuals of all generations.

There are a few personal finance tips that are universal no matter what era you grew up in.

Some of the most important that come to mind are, spend less than you make, have an emergency fund, save for retirement.

All sound pretty easy to follow, right?

But what if you are a 16-year-old sophomore versus a 45-year-old Gen Xer with two kids in college? What should you be focusing on?

Part of our focus for financial literacy month is to help customers navigate the complexed world of finance. Whether you’re a retiring Boomer, the forgotten Gen X, or the prime earning millennial, we have some personal finance tips for individuals of all generations.

Gen Z (1997 – 2012)

1. Develop a Good Mindset

The core of developing good money habits is to know how to budget. This will teach you what the value of money is.

2. Set Goals

Goals are good. Just like exercising: anytime you are trying to accomplish something, it gives you a good mindset and helps keep you motivated.

3 Learn the History of Money

The history and evolution of money is fascinating. If you’re a young person, we implore you to research and read about how money came to be what it is today.


Millennials/Gen Y (1981 – 1996)

1. Invest, Invest, Invest

Contribute enough to the get full match from your employer’s 401k. Max out your IRA. Look at opening a brokerage account and investing in low-cost index funds.

2. Take the Initiative

Being proactive is important in all facets of life. If you have a family, start thinking about a will with your spouse and planning for your children’s future, such as opening a 529 plan for their college education.

3. Find a Fiduciary

If you are not comfortable managing your own money, find a fiduciary who can help and will put your best interests ahead of their own.

Gen X (1965 – 1980)

1. Take Inventory

Look at what an estate plan might do for you, even if you don’t have a lot of assets. Taking inventory of your assets will help your family heirs and beneficiaries down the line.

2. Supercharge Your Savings

Being in the back half of your career, you may want to think about supercharging your savings even more to retire early, or for helping your adult children.

3. Look to the Future

If you haven’t already, start thinking about life after your working years. Do you plan on working part-time, traveling the world, or just sticking with your hobbies? Whatever it is make sure you are planning for whatever it is you want to do.

Boomers (1946 – 1964)

1. Keep On Keeping On

Consistency is key with money and if you are retired, or nearing it, just keep those good money habits in place and don’t make any sudden changes.

2. You Can’t Take It with You

Giving is important. Whether it’s to your favorite charity, or gifting to your children and grandchildren, we can’t take our money to the grave, so make sure you’re doing everything possible to help those you love.

3. Protect Your Assets

If you don’t have a trust in place, maybe start to think about how you are going to protect your assets and how to set up your beneficiaries for success.

The tips above aren’t the only ones out there, but we find these most important. And always remember, personal finance is just that-personal.

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